EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

At GES we offer a range of exciting extra-curricular activities. In both primary and secondary, there are over 70 clubs children can sign up for, including swimming, football, mathematics, French, science, movie club, Art and many more. The clubs run for 8 weeks per term. Each term there are new clubs to sign up for. Feedback from students of these well attended after school activities is always positive. We encourage all students to join an activity as an opportunity to broaden their educational experiences.

 

Staff are committed to providing these opportunities to support the holistic development of the children.  With these activities reflecting the staff expertise, children are given greater depth of study and access to enriched learning experiences.

 

MUSIC

Music is taught at Gulf English School (GES) from kindergarten to year-nine. We follow the National Curriculum for England and plan our music curriculum around shared classroom topics.

When your child starts in Kindergarten they will perform in a themed concert at the end of the year. They progress to the end of Reception where they perform at a Graduation ceremony. We have an International themed concert for all students in year one and year two to impart cultural awareness. All students have the opportunity to participate in the GES talent show as a showcase for our most gifted students. The highlight of 2018 will be our key-stage-two school production, “100 years of changes”.

We focus on performance and engaging your child in fun activities. They have a range of extra-curricular activities to participate in after school; we have a choir, a school band, and a guitar club.

There is never a dull moment in our music classes and students are encouraged learn an instrument. With an uptake of over twenty-five per cent of students learning an instrument, the music-department is never quiet. Year-one students transition into primary school from the Early-years-foundation-stage and are gradually inducted into a new learning environment in the first term. This is where they first start describing music with terminology such as, “short” and “long” sounds. Year-two start to learn the Ukulele to develop their sense of rhythm and pulse.

All of year-three and year-four learn the recorder to start learning note names and durations. Our target is that all students should learn to read basic music notation by the end of year five. Year five develop their use of harmony and start to read notated melodies when singing. Year six students are prepared to continue their academic journey into the secondary school where they are issued a standardized baseline assessment that is commonly used in the United Kingdom.

We introduce “The elements of music” for year seven. If your child is new to secondary and has not received music lessons before, this unit introduces basic terminology to analyse, perform and compose. The compulsory aspect of your child’s music journey ends in year nine as we do not offer a qualification in music.

Each year group in every cohort across the school will have an assembly at least once a week. It is a great opportunity for communal singing and share values. We run themed weeks throughout the year so look out for our teachers dressed as book-characters, wearing silly-socks and ties, or dressed in traditional Arabic costumes to celebrate Kuwaiti Liberation week.

 

SCHOOL TRIPS

Trip to Scientific Center

 

PHSE

PSHE at GES (Primary)

Personal, physical and health education at GES covers the moral, cultural, mental and physical development of our children. It is taught in the primary school from pre-KG to year 6.

We aim to prepare our pupils for opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life. We also make them ready for the next phase in their education by having transition days into secondary.

Themed assemblies and lessons cover some aspects of PSHE such as anti- bullying and being a good friend.

Year 4 working on anti-bullying issues

Which order do these go in?

Topics such as Healthy Lifestyle and My Family also support this area of the curriculum. Individual issues are covered by teachers as the necessity arises from incidents in the classroom or playground. This might include a session on politeness, behaviour towards peers and behaviour towards adults. PE lessons cover the physical development aspects of this.

Year 1 thinking about kindness.

It is a very important part of the curriculum and is inherent to everyday school. We place a firm emphasis on this throughout the school.

Getting to know each other

We also reward students with “Student of the Month” certificates. We have a student council which meet to discuss school matters on a regular basis.

In our playground we have a “Friendship Stop”

Thinking about our emotions using flashcards

 

We do want our pupils to understand the importance of the four areas of PSHE.

PSHE at GES (Secondary)

Studying PSHE at GES and why it’s important

 

PSHE education gives pupils the knowledge, skills, and attributes they need to keep themselves healthy and safe and to prepare them for life and work in modern Britain.

Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education is a school subject through which pupils develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to manage their lives, now and in the future.

 

These skills and attributes help pupils to stay healthy, safe and prepare them for life and work in modern Britain. When taught well, PSHE education helps pupils to achieve their academic potential, and leave school equipped with skills they will need throughout later life.

 

Our landmark 'curriculum for life' report outlines evidence of the subject's impact.

 

Why is PSHE education important to pupils?

 

PSHE education helps pupils to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to thrive as individuals, family members and members of society. From making responsible decisions about friendships to succeeding in their first job, PSHE education helps pupils to manage many of the most critical opportunities, challenges and responsibilities they will face growing up.

 

Pupils agree that PSHE education is a vital part of their preparation for life, with 92% of those who have been taught the subject believing all young people should receive high-quality PSHE lessons.

 

In 2015, the UK Youth Parliament made 'A Curriculum which prepares us for Life' a top priority, based on a consultation of almost a million young people. This was the third year in a row that PSHE education has been voted a priority by young people. PSHE education is supported by leading youth bodies such as Girlguiding and the British Youth Council.

 

Why is PSHE education important to schools?

 

While schools are not required to teach PSHE education, the subject makes a crucial contribution to schools' duties. The Education Act 2002 requires all schools to teach a curriculum that is "broadly based, balanced and meets the needs of pupils". Schools must "promote the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and prepare pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life" while having a duty to keep pupils safe.

 

Our Curriculum section outlines in detail how PSHE education helps schools fulfil their statutory responsibilities, and how high-quality PSHE education contributes to success in Ofsted inspections.

 

A growing body of research shows that pupils who are emotionally healthy do better at school. PSHE education helps children and young people to achieve their potential by supporting their wellbeing and tackling issues that can affect their ability to learn, such as anxiety and unhealthy relationships. PSHE education also helps pupils to develop skills and aptitudes - like teamwork, communication, and resilience - that are crucial to navigating the challenges and opportunities of the modern world, and are increasingly valued by employers.

 

Why is PSHE education important to parents?

 

An overwhelming majority of parents support the view that schools should prepare children for life and work, not just for exams.  90% of parents say that all schools should teach PSHE education according to 2015 YouGov polling commissioned by the PSHE Association and the subject is supported by leading parent bodies including Mumsnet, PTA UK and the National Governors Association.

 

We believe that parents welcome a partnership between home and schools which supports their children’s personal and social development, and help deal with issues of increasing complexity such as those related to mental health and staying safe, both online and offline.

Teamwork is an important part of life at GES

 

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL (SRC) OVERVIEW

The SRC is one of the most important forums at GES.  This is because the SRC body is mainly composed of student elected peers that span the entire Secondary School from year 7 to year 13.  The SRC is therefore the ‘Voice’ of the school’s student body and is respected and valued by all staff. 

The SRC has an elected committee that is usually made up of KS4/5 students.  The committee organises weekly minuted meetings which follow a pre-set agenda.  The agenda and minutes are published so that all staff and students are aware of developments and initiatives being undertaken.  This system allows a healthy exchange of ideas throughout the school.

Over the years some of the important work the SRC has done include:

  • A vital student-staff link

  • Charitable fund raising

  • Social and Academic student activities

  • Student curriculum development contributions

  • Local, regional and international Travel opportunities

  • Cultural awareness and development events

 

COMMUNITY SERVICES

Y12 students have had the opportunity to assist at a Special Needs School called Khalifa School and here are some of their thoughts:

Hi, I’m Dana. My role at Khalifa School is to assist a teacher of students that mainly have celebral palsy. I spend about two hours each week and have learnt how to communicate with such children. I feel positive about my experience as it’s given me the chance to give something back to the community in which I live. I have learnt so much about the disabilities of the children and what they are able to do and how they learn at Khalifa School via sensory, morning circle and physiotherapy. I would recommend helping out because I’ve learnt so much and the feeling of giving is so great. The children are so precious and sweet.

It has been an eye-opening, spiritual and wonderful experience.

Hi, I’m Rowia, I volunteer rather like a teacher’s assistant at Khalifa School. I help children with classwork, make sure they are doing what they are supposed to do. I spent between two to four hours at Khalifa School per week. I have learnt to be patient. My experience has opened my eyes  and seen the world from a different perspective. I have found the experience inspiring.

Hi, I’m Cailin. I help my assigned teacher in guiding the students and helping them learn necessary skills. I help to teach disabled children and offer my support. I have used my skill of patience to be fair when they are struggling. I have learnt to be firm when necessary as my class are old enough to acquire certain skills. My experience has been positive. The relationship between student, teacher and supervisor is honestly quite commendable as there seems to be an atmosphere of respect and genuine friendship and support which I greatly appreciate about this place. I have learnt to accept, appreciate and to be patient.

Hi, I’m Sarah. I spend around 4 to 5 hours a week at Khalifa School. I sit and help the students. I think patience is the most valuable skill that I have learnt. I feel my experience working at Khalifa School has been very positive because it has made me more grateful for everything and it has shown me that it is the little things that matter and make us happy.  It’s been such an inspiring experience for me and so heart-warming. I’ve loved helping out there.

Hi, I’m Rufaida. I go twice a week to Khalifa School and spend about one to two hours. I have seen how another school functions and it has helped me to understand how to communicate with people who have different abilities. I’ve found my experience to be motivational, eye-opening and educational.

Hi, I’m Nada. I would spend between one to two hours a day at Khalifa School, once a week. I’ve found my time to be a positive one there. By helping out there I have improved how to communicate and different ways of interacting and dealing with young people such as myself. I have also learnt that there are so many ways of finding happiness and being successful through the learning process as well. I have also learnt how to be more patient. Helping others is lacking in this world and doing more of this will only strengthen the bond between all human beings. My experience has been positive, hopeful and inspirational. 

 

SPORTS

 

CLUBS

List of primary clubs

 

Clubs take place in the first and second term for eight weeks. They are a chance to improve skills and techniques through a range of activities – PE, music, academic, art and craft and others. The academic clubs enable children to improve their abilities in writing maths and science. They are fun to belong to and give the chance to meet new friends. They take place after school for one hour and are a sociable occasion. Children can join as many clubs as they wish, according to the timetable of what is being offered.

 

This academic year we have offered:

Swimming 

Football   

Basketball 

Maths homework

Mental maths

English homework

French

Phonics

Writing

Stone Painting - Rock Club

Finger crochet

Stop animation

List of Secondary clubs

Making rock aliens

Gardening and planting 

Science 

Spelling

Make it (art and craft)     

Maths intervention  

Handwriting

Lego

Music – guitar and recorder

Competition is good for building up speed in maths club

Mental maths club year 2

 

INJAZ

Company Program

RINJAZ-Kuwait is a non-profit organization that was established in Kuwait in 2005 with a mission to inspire and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy.

 

As a member nation of Junior Achievement (JA) Worldwide and INJAZ Al-Arab, INJAZ-Kuwait benefits from programs that efficiently link business principles to schools curricula, bringing together students, teachers, and corporate members.

 

INJAZ-Kuwait works with students between the ages of 11-24 years through implementing programs in middle schools, high schools, vocational colleges, and universities. Our focus is on 3 core pillars:

 

  1. Entrepreneurship

  2. Work Readiness

  3. Financial Literacy

 

Students gain real-life experience of being part of an organization that they have developed from the start. Here are just a few of the many skills and talents that have been acquired by the students.

 

Teamwork

Time Management

Communication Skills

Presentation skills

Report Writing

Resilience

 

Sales

Design

Creativity

Marketing

Product/Service

Promotion

 

Development

Achievement

Advertising

Problem Solving

Determination

Finance

 

It has been a pleasure to be associated with the Company Program and I am so proud of each and every one of you.    Good Luck for the competition being held in Kuwait on 20th and 21st April 2018!

 

 

In Class Program

 

INJAZ-Kuwait is a non-profit organization that was established in Kuwait in 2005 with a mission to inspire and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy.

 

As a member nation of Junior Achievement (JA) Worldwide and INJAZ Al-Arab, INJAZ-Kuwait benefits from programs that efficiently link business principles to schools curricula, bringing together students, teachers, and corporate members.

 

INJAZ-Kuwait works with students between the ages of 11-24 years through implementing programs in middle schools, high schools, vocational colleges, and universities. Our focus is on 3 core pillars:

 

  1. Entrepreneurship

  2. Work Readiness

  3. Financial Literacy

 

As part of the In-Class Program, the students gained experience in the following areas. 

 

Year 7 Our Nation-students gained knowledge of the traditions, cultural and historical information of Kuwait.

 

Year 8 Personal Finance-Students gained knowledge and understanding of managing their personal finances.

 

Year 9 Career Success and Entrepreneur Master Class

 

Year 10 Personal Finance and Innovation Camp

 

Year 11 Personal Finance-Students gained knowledge and understanding of managing their personal finances.

 

Year 12 Personal Finance-Finance-Students gained knowledge and understanding of managing their personal finances.

 

Year 13 Personal Finance-Finance-Students gained knowledge and understanding of managing their personal finances.

 

The Entrepreneur Master Class and the Innovation Camp was a full day program where students competed in teams and they were judged against set criteria by a much-respected panel of judges from Kuwait’s leading figures in Business.

 

© 2019 Gulf English School, All Rights Reserved

Gulf English School
 K U W A I T
CONTACT
Gulf English School
Al Dimanah Street Block 4
+ 965 2575 7022 / 2575 7952
USEFUL LINKS
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon
IMG-20180110-WA0023